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ENGL 057 - Critical Connections - Gendrue: Internet

Google Search Tips

Use the Advanced feature of Google to be more specific in your search

  1. Type "related:" to find pages that Google thinks are related in content. Try related:www.marquette.edu/library.
  2. Type "site:" to search for information within a certain website or domain. For example: "colon cancer site:cancer.org" will yield results about colon cancer on the American Cancer Society website.
  3. Type "intext:" in Google News to pull terms from the body of the story.
  4. Type "define:" to access the built-in dictionary.

Internet Search Tips

Try these to get more specific or broader results

Wild Card

  • Use a * to include forms or variants of words in your search
  • Example: type test* to search for test, testing, tests

Adding a ~

  • Adding a tilde (~) to your search term will return related terms.
  • Example: ~nutrition will search also nutrition, food and health

Adding a -

  • Adding a negative (-) to your search term will take away that term in your search.
  • Example: Pets -cats will not find web sites that focus upon cats as pets.

Phrase Search

  • By inserting quotes around an exact phase, you will search only the words you type in, in that exact order with no words in between term.
  • Example: "consumer product chemistry"

Boolean Operators

  • Using AND, OR, NOT can broaden or narrow a search depending on your inquiry. "AND" will give you results that contain both words. "OR" will give results about either word and "NOT" will not search the term preceding.
  • Example: Summer AND Flower, Summer OR Flower, Summer NOT flower

Useful Websites

Evaluating Internet Sites

Credibility

  • Who is the author or organization responsible for the information?
  • What are the author’s credentials? (experience, education, academic or 
  • professional affiliations)
  • Are the expert and the webmaster the same person?

Accuracy

  • Are references included that verify the information’s source?
  • Is the information consistent with other sources on the topic?
  • Are there mistakes in spelling and word usage?

Bias/Objectivity (Fact vs. Opinion)

  • Is more than one viewpoint or opinion expressed?
  • Is the information presented as fact or opinion?
  • Is the site’s purpose to inform? To entertain? To persuade? To explain? To advocate a cause? To sell a product?
  • Does the author use emotionally charged language?

Timeliness

  • When was the site’s last update?
  • When was the information compiled originally?
  • Is the information still valid or is it out of date?

Relevance

  • Is the information directed toward a general or specialized audience?
  • Is the information comprehensive enough for your needs? Specific enough? Too detailed? Too vague?
  • Does the information cover the correct period of time for your topic? The correct geographical area?