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ENGL 102 - English Composition II - Schmidt

Levels of Periodicals

Scholarly

Substantive News or General Interest

Popular

Scholarly journals generally have a sober, serious look.  They often contain many graphs and charts but few glossy pages of exciting pictures.

These periodicals may be quite attractive in appearance, although some are in newspaper format.  Articles are often heavily illustrated, generally with photographs.

Popular periodicals come in many formats, although are often somewhat slick and attractive in appearance.  Lots of graphics (photographs, drawings, etc.).

Scholarly journals ALWAYS cite their sources in the form of footnotes or bibliographies.

News and general interest periodicals sometimes cite sources, though more often do not.

These publications rarely, if ever, cite sources.  Information published in such journals is often second or third hand and the original source is sometimes obscure.

Articles are written by a scholar in the field or by someone who has done research in the field.

Articles may be written by a member of the editorial staff, or scholar or free lance writer.

Articles written by staff members or free lance writers.

The language of scholarly journals is that of the discipline covered.  It assumes some scholarly background on the part of the reader.

The language of these publications is geared to any educated audience - -no specialty is assumed, only interest and a certain level of intelligence.

Articles are usually very short, written in simple language and are designed for a minimal education level; generally there is little depth to these articles.

The main purpose is to report on original research or experimentation in order to make such information available to the rest of the scholarly world.

The main purpose is to provide information, in a general manner, to a broad audience of concerned citizens.

The main purpose is to entertain the reader, to sell products (their own or advertisers), and/or promote a viewpoint.

Many scholar journals, though by no means all, are published by a specific professional organization.

Generally published by commercial enterprises or individuals, although some emanate from specific professional organizations.

Often give advice on how to use information

 

Sample Sources of Different Levels (with MLA Citations)

Professors use a lot of different phrases to describe a specific set of publications. Whether they call it Academic or Scholarly, what they frequently mean is that they want you to find articles by researchers that have been published in a peer-reviewed journal. Many scholarly journals, though by no means all, are published by a specific professional organization. These articles are mainly written by people who work or teach (and thus are considered "scholars") in their respective fields and report on original research or experimentation in order to make such information available to the rest of the scholarly world. Scholarly journals generally have a sober, serious look and contain many graphs and charts but few glossy pages of exciting pictures. The language used in scholarly journals is that of the discipline covered and assumes some scholarly background on the part of the reader. Scholarly journals ALWAYS cite their sources in the form of footnotes or bibliographies.

Generally published by commercial enterprises or individuals, these periodicals may be quite attractive in appearance and are usually include photographs or large illustrations. While some may come from specific professional organizations, no specialty reader is assumed from the reader, only interest and a certain level of intelligence. The main purpose is to provide information, in a general manner, to a broad audience of concerned citizens and may even be presented in a newspaper format. Articles are written by a member of the editorial staff or a freelance writer (who might even be a scholar in the field) and while they might cite some sources, they more often do not.

Popular periodicals come in many formats, although are often somewhat slick and attractive in appearance with lots of graphics (photographs, drawings, etc.). These short articles are written by staff members or freelance writers using simple language designed for a minimal education level. There is little depth to these articles and the information is often second- or third-hand with the original source hard to determine, especially since they rarely cite their sources. Their main purpose is to entertain the reader, to sell products (their own or advertisers), or promote a viewpoint.